Meet the women using coffee to answer all your beauty needs

… reduce the appearance of certain skin conditions.” Johnson founded Melbourne-based Frank Body along with fellow copywriters Erika Geraerts and Jess Hatzis in 2013 after her partner Steve Rowley, a coffee shop owner, noticed he’d had a number of older women coming into one of his cafes and asking to take away the leftover coffee grinds. Initially assuming the women wanted to use the leftovers as fertiliser in their gardens, he soon discovered the actual reason – they were using it as a body …

Cascara ‘Tea’: A Tasty Infusion Made From Coffee Waste

By Murray Carpenter | December 3, 2015 Cascara is made by brewing dried coffee cherries, which typically would have otherwise ended up as compost. “We have been throwing away this perfectly good coffee fruit for a long time, and there’s no real reason for it, because it tastes delicious,” says Peter Giuliano, of the Specialty Coffee Association of America. Murray Carpenter for NPR Coffee lovers may have noticed a new …

Mast Brothers Respond to Chocolate Attacks — Grub Street

By Sierra Tishgart | December 10 2015 The Mast Brothers Respond to Attacks on Their Chocolate’s Authenticity You really can’t argue with the great packaging, though. Photo: Mast Brothers Since brothers Rick and Michael Mast launched Mast Brothers in Brooklyn in 2007, chocolate experts have long debated the reason for the brand’s popularity. Is the chocolate actually high-quality and bean-to-bar, as claimed, or is most of …

12 most annoying things customers do when ordering coffee

… the menu, there’s a reason it’s there. It’s supposed to be good. A few of the other baristas we spoke to remarked that they’re baffled by the people who ask them for advice about what to get and then order something else completely. “Why even ask?” says JT. 4. Crazy drink requests “‘I’ll have the mocha frappe magical unicorn latte with soy milk,'” quips JT. “If your order takes five minutes to say, then don’t order it. …

Paramount Coffee Project Brings Flat Whites and Vegemite Dust to Fairfax Avenue 

  By Valentina Silva | October 23, 2015 The Aussie import is serving a distinct coffee culture and a unique cross-cultural menu In 2000, Starbucks entered the Australian market, eventually opening 84 stores across the continent. Just eight years later, the corporate coffee giant had closed 60 locations and posted over $100 million in losses. The reason? You don’t mess with Australians and their coffee. Rooted in an Italian immigration boom in the aftermath of World War II, …