Used coffee grounds provide business opportunity for mushroom moguls – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

By Laura Gartry | October 10, 2015

PHOTO: Ryan Creed, (left) and Julian Mitchell mix mushroom spores with coffee grinds. (ABC News: Laura Gartry)

A little-known method of using coffee grounds to grow mushrooms may soon result in Fremantle boasting WA’s first urban mushroom farm, if a crowd-funding campaign is successful.

The plan by two fly-in-fly-out mine workers would see the fungi grown in used coffee grounds sourced for free from around 70 cafes in the city.

Ryan Creed and Julian Mitchell saw a market for mushrooms and a cheap way to grow them, with moist coffee grounds providing the perfect soil for gourmet oyster mushrooms.

“We’ll be cycling around the CBD area of Fremantle daily, picking up the coffee ground, taking it to our commercial space, mixing it with mushroom spores,” Mr Creed said.

“Within six weeks we’ll have mushrooms starting to grow which we’ll sell to the local restaurants, the markets and also to the local people who will be able to grow their own mushrooms in their mushroom box.”

The easiest way to health, to achieve health with people, is to … grow food in their own back yard. -Life Cykel founder Ryan Creed

Mr Creed said only 1 per cent of the coffee bean ended up in the cup, while the remaining ground becomes a problematic waste product.

“When coffee waste goes to landfill it creates methane gas, and we have the ability to now divert that away from landfill, grow local food, grow oyster mushrooms which is healthy,” he said.

The two would-be mushroom moguls set up “Life Cykel”, with a view to create more local jobs and food in sustainable way.

They estimate there are about 150 coffee houses in the larger Fremantle area, with an average coffee ground production of 30 kilograms per week.

This waste results in around six tons of used coffee beans going to landfill each week and reaching up to 300 tonnes per year.

As well as setting up a commercial urban farm, Life Cykel also hopes to encourage more people to grow their own mushrooms with boxed home kits.

“The easiest way to health, to achieve health with people, is to … grow food in their own back yard,” Mr Creed said.

“The fastest way to achieve that … was spraying water on a mushroom box, and harvesting your own mushrooms within 14 days, would be an exceptional way to improve people’s health and happiness.”

Once the coffee grounds are finished with growing mushrooms, it will be treated and sent to gardens.

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Source: Used coffee grounds provide business opportunity for mushroom moguls – ABC News (Australian Broadcasting Corporation)

America’s biggest coffee snobs are not in Seattle, but wide-eyed and alert in Alaska | Life and style | The Guardian

By Julia O’Malley, Anchorage | August 19, 2015

Barista Henri Thomas works the slow bar at SteamDot in Anchorage. Photograph: Ash Adams for the Guardian

You think your Starbucks cold-brew coffee is trendy? People in Anchorage were buying bottled cold brew five years ago. As for your pour-over black cup made with single-origin beans from a small farm in Africa? Yawn. Fairbanks has been doing that since the 1990s.

Little-known fact: Alaska is among the most coffee-obsessed states in the nation. Some years, the coffee-shop-to-human ratio in Anchorage has been higher than Seattle, making it the most caffeinated place in the America (at last count, in 2011, it dropped to number two, with about one coffee shop for every 2,000 souls.)

You cannot escape the coffee carts here, common as roadside moose, each with its unique brand: The Sugar Shack, Java the Hut, Fred’s Bail Bonding and CoffeeCabana. And then, there are the local coffee shops.

Espresso pours at SteamDot Coffee. Photograph: Ash Adams

Anchorage-based Kaladi Brothers Coffee, the largest among half a dozen serious coffee roasters in the state, roasts 1.2m pounds of beans per year, enough for every man, woman and child in the state to brew at least five pots of strong coffee each. One of the biggest share goes to the oil fields on Alaska’s North Slope, where workers are on 24 hours a day, says Dale Tran, the company’s chief operating officer. Kaladi has 15 stores in Alaska and one in Seattle.

Alaskans joke that anything trendy in the Lower 48 shows up in Alaska three to five years after its popularity has crested. Olive Garden. Cupcakes. Fro-yo. But the rule does not apply when it comes to coffee. Anchorage’s first espresso shop, Cafe Del Mundo, opened just a few years after Starbucks opened its flagship store.Alaska consumers’ relationship with coffee has a certain razor-sharp west coast attitude to it, brewers say, more discerning than you might expect.

Take Leif Sawyer, a network engineer for a communications company in Anchorage.

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Source: America’s biggest coffee snobs are not in Seattle, but wide-eyed and alert in Alaska | Life and style | The Guardian

World Chocolate Day: 10 weird chocolate facts – Telegraph

By Saffron Alexander | July 7, 2015

Did you know that a chocolate river once existed? Ten weird and wonderful facts about cocoa bean products in honour of World Chocolate Day

Augustus Gloop drowning in a river of real chocolate Photo: REUTERS

1. A chocolate river exists

Well it did, back in 1971. The famous chocolate river Augustus Gloop almost drowned in in the original Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factoryfilm was made 15,000 gallons of water mixed with chocolate and cream.

With all the cream, the river spoiled fairly quickly and the cast revealed it left a terrible smell.

2. Chocolate was used as money


(EPA)

In Mayan times the cocoa bean was used as currency as it was considered to be worth more than gold dust. Cultivation of the beans was restricted so the value of cocoa beans as money would not go down.

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Source: World Chocolate Day: 10 weird chocolate facts – Telegraph

Coffee Cake with Chocolate Streusel Recipe – Bon Appétit

Recipe by Jessie Damuck | June 24, 2015

This recipe comes from Test Kitchen contributor Jessie Damuck’s grandmother, Kathy. The story goes that in a house devoid of sweets, this was the only dessert she ever made. It remains a family—and Bon Appétit Test Kitchen—favorite.

Photograph by Alex Lau

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Source: Coffee Cake with Chocolate Streusel Recipe – Bon Appétit

The end of Kit Kat? Judges rules that four-finger chocolate treat can’t be trademarked – Mirror Online

By Alex Wellman | June 11, 2015

Row: Nestle had wanted to trademark the four-fingered version of their snack

Nestlé has been given a two-fingered salute in its attempt to trademark the shape of a Kit Kat chocolate bar.

The food giant had asked Europe to intervene on its attempts to trademark its four-finger KitKat bar in the UK but has been told it does not comply with European law.

The decision by the advocate general is not legally binding, but their opinions are nearly always followed by judges at the European Court.

Nestle had tried unsuccessfully to trademark the snack at the High Court in 2013.

The company claimed that in the 80 years since the chocolate bar was introduced, the four fingers had become almost completely associated with KitKats.

Source: The end of Kit Kat? Judges rules that four-finger chocolate treat can’t be trademarked – Mirror Online