Research Into Yeast Hybrids Could Mean More Brews And Better Chocolate – AskMen

By Joel Balsam | December 5, 2015

Trending News: New Research Into Yeast Hybridization Could Bring Forth A Beer And Chocolate Revolution

Why Is This Important?

Because if we were going through a craft beer revolution before, what will it be like when this breaks off?

Long Story Short

Research into yeast hybrids could make it easier to develop new tastes for such awesome things as beer, wine, whiskey, and chocolate.


Long Story

Are there two more boring words than yeast hybridization? Maybe not, but when you hear how new research into it could change all the best foods in life, you’ll be singing these two words.

First off, a little primer; yeast is essential to the process of fermentation. When we combine two yeast species like the two Patagonian strains that combined naturally 500 years ago, we get the key ingredient for awesome things like lager beer — the most consumed alcoholic beverage the world over, reports Phys.org.

But yeast strains don’t usually come together on their own, the odds of a similar hybridization are one in a billion. But new research has found a way to speed up the hybridization process to as quick a turnaround as just a week. And that could mean a whole slew of different flavors and pigments to some of our favorite foods, according to Chris Todd Hittinger, senior author of the study published in Fungal Genetics and Biology and a University of Wisconsin-Madison professor of genetics.

I’m not joking about yeast being used in all the best foods and drinks; everything from beer to wine cider, whiskey, cheese, yogurt, soy sauce, and of course bread, which you knew from home ec. class, right?

“If you have a favorite ale strain, for example, you should easily be able to hybridize it with a wild strain using this method,” Hittinger said toPhys.org. “There is a lot of potential out there for new flavors and combinations.”

Beyond cool new craft beers and wines, we could be seeing more variance in chocolate flavors, as well.

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Source: Research Into Yeast Hybrids Could Mean More Brews And Better Chocolate – AskMen

Coffee versus tea: It’s the ultimate hot drink face-off 

By Katherine Martinko | October 23, 2015

What’s it going to be? Check out this fun infographic to learn amusing and interesting facts about both popular beverages.

Do you ever get into animated conversations (a.k.a. arguments) with friends or family members about what’s better – coffee or tea? Chances are, if you’re a self-professed coffee addict or a faithful tea lover, then you must find yourself debating the merits of your preferred hot beverage with people who think differently. The following infographic, while adding fuel to the fire, will provide some interesting history and perspective on the two most popular beverages of the cold-weather season.

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Source: Coffee versus tea: It’s the ultimate hot drink face-off : TreeHugger

Paramount Coffee Project Brings Flat Whites and Vegemite Dust to Fairfax Avenue 

 

By Valentina Silva | October 23, 2015

The Aussie import is serving a distinct coffee culture and a unique cross-cultural menu

In 2000, Starbucks entered the Australian market, eventually opening 84 stores across the continent. Just eight years later, the corporate coffee giant had closed 60 locations and posted over $100 million in losses. The reason? You don’t mess with Australians and their coffee.

Rooted in an Italian immigration boom in the aftermath of World War II, Australia’s coffee culture prizes not only good food and drink, but also attentive customer service and spaces conducive to socializing. Paramount Coffee Project, which made its stateside debut last month, is aiming to bring a bit of that scene to Fairfax Avenue.

“For me, going out and getting in line for a cup of coffee is very foreign because I wouldn’t get back in line to have that second coffee. [Australians] are all about having a cup of coffee, sitting down, and showing up,” says P.C.P. co-founder Mark Dundon.

While he says he certainly understands the merits and necessity of grab-and-go coffee for the fast-paced L.A. lifestyle, Dundon is hoping that the slower-paced and more social aspects of his country’s cafe culture will resonate with Angelenos. “It’s great to see people coming in with their friends and talking, or catching up with a friend and enjoying a half-an-hour just hanging out.”

 

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Source: Paramount Coffee Project Brings Flat Whites and Vegemite Dust to Fairfax Avenue – Los Angeles Magazine

Polly Waffle set to return to shelves thanks to Melbourne company Chocolate Works

By Marissa Calligeros | October 22, 2015

The old Polly Waffle

It was ditched from Australian shelves six years ago, but the power of nostalgia and a social media campaign has seen the return of the Polly Waffle.

The Polly Waffle – crispy wafer tube filled with marshmallow and coated in milk chocolate – will be reborn as “The Great Aussie Waffle Log” thanks to a 40,000-strong social media campaign that piqued the interest of Melbourne company Chocolate Works.

The sweet log was first produced by Melbourne company Hoadley’s Chocolate in 1947.

The new ‘Great Aussie Waffle Log’

Hoadley’s was bought by Nestle during the 1980s and the little brown log was discontinued by the confectioners in November 2009 due to poor sales.

There’s many a chocolate log that has entered the Australian sweet pantheon, but only a select few have survived the test of time.

According to business executive manager at Nestle, Martin Brown, the chocolate bars that stand alongside kookaburras, boomerangs and Bradman in Australian iconography, are both “novel in character and catchy in name”.

Here are some classics that tick the boxes:

Violet Crumble: Like the Polly Waffle, the chocolate-coated honeycomb bar was first produced by Hoadley’s more than 90 years ago.

 

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Source: Polly Waffle set to return to shelves thanks to Melbourne company Chocolate Works

Wirral plastic surgeon harnesses the power of tea to develop cream to prevent scarring

By Lorna Hughes | October 17, 2015

Douglas McGeorge, who is based at Spire Murrayfield Hospital near Irby, worked with scientist Dr Ardeshir Bayat

Spire Murrayfield Hospital near Heswall. Plastic Surgeon Douglas McGeorge with the Solution for Scars cream which he helped develop.

A Wirral plastic surgeon is using the therapeutic powers of the cuppa to help prevent scarring.

Douglas McGeorge, a former president of the British Association of Aesthetic Plastic Surgeons (BAAPS), used green tea to create a cream he says switches off the body’s inflammatory response once a wound is healed – reducing itching and discomfort and limiting scar thickening.

Mr McGeorge, who is based at Spire Murrayfield Hospital in Thingwall worked with scientist Dr Ardeshir Bayat over a number of years to develop the cream.

The two medics have now formed their own company, Science of Skin Ltd, and are selling the cream online for £18.99.

Mr McGeorge said: “If you operate on a foetus while it is still in the womb the baby will be born without a scar. This is because before birth skin and tissue is repaired by regeneration.

“But post birth we heal in a different way, by inflammation, which is far quicker as the body needs to repair more quickly, but unfortunately it results in scars.

“What Solution for Scars cream does, once it is absorbed into the skin, is turn off the body’s inflammatory response which can create thickened, uncomfortable scars.”

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Source: Wirral plastic surgeon harnesses the power of tea to develop cream to prevent scarring – Liverpool Echo